Do you feel anxious at times?

These questions can help you to understand if anxiety affects your daily life. Depending on your responses you will be provided with further information which can help you including options for seeking support.

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Question 1

Feeling nervous, anxious or on edge

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Question 2

Not being able to stop or control worrying

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Question 3

Worrying too much about different things

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Question 4

Trouble relaxing

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Question 5

Being so restless that it is hard to sit still

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Question 6

Becoming easily annoyed or irritable

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Question 7

Feeling afraid as if something awful might happen

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You scored

Your score suggests that you currently have good mental well-being, with no or very low level symptoms of anxiety. You may wish to look at the information and links in the Emotional Wellbeing section whilst monitoring how you are feeling.

You scored

Your score suggests that you may be feeling anxious some of the time. Follow this link to find advice and information about emotional well-being

You scored

We would recommend that you get help and support.

You can contact your health visitor for advice or support (0208 836 8621) or make an appointment with your GP.

You can refer yourself to Talk Together Bromley (0300 003 3000) who offer free and confidential talking therapies.

If you need to speak to someone urgently please contact your GP, you can also get emergency help at your nearest Accident and Emergency department:

Princess Royal University Hospital, Farnborough Common, Orpington, Kent, BR6 8ND

Tel: 01689 863486

Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Stadium Road, Woolwich, London, SE18 4QH

Tel: 020 8836 4360/1

24 Hour support:

If it is an emergency you can contact the Oxleas Mental Health Urgent Advice Line on 0800 330 8590 (24 hours, seven days a week).

The Samaritans are also available 24 hours a day on 116 123 (UK Freephone number).

 

This questionnaire is not a substitute for a full clinical assessment and if you are concerned about your health please see your doctor.

You scored

We would recommend that you get help and support.

You can contact your health visitor for advice or support (0208 836 8621) or make an appointment with your GP.

You can refer yourself to Talk Together Bromley (0300 003 3000) who offer free and confidential talking therapies.

If you need to speak to someone urgently please contact your GP, you can also get emergency help at your nearest Accident and Emergency department:

Princess Royal University Hospital, Farnborough Common, Orpington, Kent, BR6 8ND

Tel: 01689 863486

Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Stadium Road, Woolwich, London, SE18 4QH

Tel: 020 8836 4360/1

24 Hour support:

If it is an emergency you can contact the Oxleas Mental Health Urgent Advice Line on 0800 330 8590 (24 hours, seven days a week).

The Samaritans are also available 24 hours a day on 116 123 (UK Freephone number).

 

This questionnaire is not a substitute for a full clinical assessment and if you are concerned about your health please see your doctor.

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Emotional Wellbeing

Having a new baby can be an emotional time. Many new parents will feel happiness but also worried and overwhelmed at times with a newborn to look after. Symptoms like tiredness, irritability or poor appetite are normal if you’ve just had a baby. These are usually mild and don’t stop you leading a normal life.

Around 1 in 5 women suffer depression or anxiety during their pregnancy or in the year after giving birth. Fathers and partners can also suffer from depression or anxiety at this time. Depression or anxiety during pregnancy or after a baby is born can be extremely distressing.

Symptoms of postnatal depression or anxiety can include low mood, feeling anxious or irritable, having guilty or negative thoughts, and being unable to enjoy things. These symptoms last at least two weeks. Many parents do not realise that they have postnatal depression or anxiety, as symptoms can appear gradually.

Some parents find it very difficult to tell their friends and family or health professionals how they are feeling. If you think you have depression or anxiety, don’t struggle alone. Contact your health visitor or make an appointment with your GP. If you don’t feel up to making an appointment, ask someone to do it for you.

Postnatal depression or anxiety can be treated with talking therapy. You may be referred for counselling with Talk Together Bromley, or you can also refer yourself. More severe cases often require antidepressants and you may need to see your GP or a specialist.

Sometimes, depression in pregnancy can continue as postnatal depression. If you are pregnant and experiencing symptoms of depression or anxiety, is important to seek help as soon as you can.

Being pregnant and becoming a parent are times where you may be more at risk of other mental health conditions. You can find more information about these here.